Newsletter

May 2017

By James Le Grice

This article is a contribution from our UK network partner firm Four Communications based in London.

It’s rare these days to have an election with such a certain outcome.

Such is the current state of UK politics that Prime Minister Theresa May called a snap General Election fully certain that her Conservative Party could substantially increase its Parliamentary majority. Mrs May claims this is necessary to strengthen her hand in the Brexit negotiations; critics call it political opportunism. What is less discussed is that Brexit will require the Prime Minister to make some tough, potentially unpopular decisions on public spending and foreign policy, decisions that will require electoral confidence.


May 2017

By Gabriella Ippolito

This April, President of Argentina Mauricio Macri visited the United States for an official working visit with his U.S. counterpart President Donald Trump at the White House. President Macri also met with U.S. Congressional leadership, including Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell and Speaker of the House Paul Ryan and gave a public address at the Center for Strategic and International Studies. The topics under discussion included bilateral trade, the crisis in Venezuela, combating narcotics trafficking in the region, and the further declassification of documents relevant to the Argentine military dictatorship.


May 2017

By Rafael Molina

Mr. Molina is a partner with Newstate Partners providing specialised debt management services to sovereign governments and central banks, particularly during times of economic distress.

For one weekend every fall and spring, the International Monetary Fund and the World Bank Group come together in Washington, DC to discuss a variety of topics, including the global economy, financial markets, developments among member countries, and the organizations' initiatives and programs being carried out around the world.


April 2017

By Jeremiah Baronberg

Government regulation is increasingly in the headlines in the United States today, as the new Trump administration and Republican majority Congress has made regulatory reform and a key part of its governing philosophy.

As part of this approach, one regulation that was recently rolled back was a 2010 bipartisan Congressional effort to address corruption around the world—particularly in undemocratic and poorer, developing countries—by bringing greater transparency to the impact of international private sector energy exploration.


April 2017

By Jesica Dobbins Lindgren

As the European Union turns 60 years old this year, both pundits and detractors are looking at the shape and fate of the post-World War II experiment. Now comprising 28 member countries, what we now call “the EU” began with the signing of the two Treaties of Rome on March 25, 1957. One of the treaties, the European Economic Community (EEC), laid the foundation geographically and philosophically for the current framework and ideals of the European Union.


April 2017

By Norman Rozenberg

Around the world, international institutions and regulators are increasingly pressuring global banks to implement tougher measures to govern illicit financial flows and crimes, such as money laundering and financing for terrorism. In response, and particularly in volatile and smaller countries with limited financial markets and where local banks may be unable to meet these requirements, their global bank partners are increasingly cutting business ties with local affiliates and departing the market altogether.


March 2017

By Jeremiah Baronberg

This May, the World Health Organization (WHO) will elect its next director-general to lead the 194-nation United Nations membership agency. The WHO was created with the charge of helping safeguard the health of the world’s population by focusing on global preparedness and responding to public health challenges.


March 2017

By Jesica Dobbins Lindgren

“Without better governance, our goals of ending extreme poverty and boosting shared prosperity will be out of reach.”
- World Bank Group President Jim Young Kim


March 2017

By Jeremiah Baronberg

“We want a future of work that works for all and gender justice at the workplace is central to this.”
Guy Ryder, Director-General of the International Labour Organization


February 2017

 

By Jeremiah Baronberg

 

During the recent U.S. presidential campaign, Donald Trump made reshaping America’s involvement in international economic affairs a centerpiece of his platform. As a candidate, he specifically called out international trade—from abandoned factories to lost jobs and competitive wages—as a locus for many of the economic and societal challenges facing the country. Since being elected president, Mr. Trump has gone so far as to threaten to "tear up" or renegotiate existing U.S. free trade agreements (FTAs). He has also stated his preference for negotiating new bilateral trade pacts as opposed to broader regional agreements.


February 2017

By Amanda Valdez

Ms. Valdez is a Partner at Dentons Lopez Velarde based in Mexico City, where she focuses on energy, mergers and acquisitions, and project finance.

For the past 70 years since nationalization, the exploration and production of oil and gas in Mexico has been subject to a state monopoly and entrusted to Pemex, the national oil company. Pemex historic significance and economic weight as a contributor to public revenues has been unique in Mexico.


February 2017

By James Le Grice

This article is a contribution from our network partner firm Insight Consulting Group based in London.

Theresa May has put Britain’s special relationship with the U.S. at the heart of her Brexit strategy. On the surface this seems a wise move. Anglo-American relations have experienced a resurgence whilst EU-U.S. relations have soured following the inauguration of President Trump. Both the EU and the U.S. are in need of the Atlantic bridge that Britain has historically provided. However, with major changes to the European status quo and U.S. foreign policy on the horizon, May will need to demonstrate that Britain can be more than a middleman if its influence on both sides of the Atlantic is to survive.